Medicaid Madness – The Latest in Eligibility Requirements



Medicaid is state regulated and funded health insurance that helps
low-income persons who can’t afford medical care pay for some
and/or all of their medical bills. If you qualify and don’t have
medical insurance, Medicaid can help you stay healthy and assist
you till you find other resources. Medicaid is available only to
people with limited income and has strict limitations. In order to
qualify, you must fall into a group of persons that meet specific
criteria. Medicaid pays money directly to your health care
providers. Depending on your state’s rules, you may also be asked
to pay a small part of the cost (co-payment) for some medical
services or prescription drugs. .

Many groups of people can be covered under Medicaid that will
qualify under their own group’s specific guideline. Some examples
of group’s requirements can include your age, whether you are
pregnant, disabled, blind, or aged or your income and resources.
Resources can be cash or any item that can be sold for a
substantial amount of money, or bank accounts, or property. Another
requirement is whether you are a U.S. citizen or a lawfully
admitted immigrant. The rules for counting your income and
resources vary from state to state and from group to group, so you
should check the requirements that pertain to where you are living.

In addition, for those persons living in a nursing home or at home
with disabilities, there are specific rule and guidelines to be
met. Your dependent child or children may be eligible for coverage
if they are U.S. citizens or a lawfully admitted immigrant, even if
you are not. Eligibility for children is based on the child’s
status, not the parent’s. Also, if someone else’s child lives with
you, the child may be eligible even if you are not because your
income and resources will not count for the child.

General eligibility requirements you must meet to obtain Medicaid
in your state may vary from other states, but they are pretty mush
based on the same criteria. You must meet the income, dependent,
resources, and other various requirements asked on the application
to qualify. People who qualify are individuals over 65, blind, and
disabled for social security disability purposes. Others are
families or single parents with children under 21 year old who
either don’t make enough money, don’t have health benefits at a
reasonable cost, or are on public assistance. Single and married
persons with a temporary disability, limited income, special
circumstance, or between the ages 59-64 also can meet the criteria.
If you need to seek drug or alcohol treatment, or are the victim of
domestic violence you are eligible for Medicaid during treatment
and possibly after the crisis is over. You can also qualify if you
are caring for a child or disabled person.

When applying for Medicaid your eligibility is determined by your
income and that can come from various sources. They compare the
income and to the size of the family to determine if they qualify.
Qualifying income is, and not limited to, earned wages, interest,
dividends, social security, veterans’ benefits, pensions, child
support, and spouse or partner’s income if living with them. Types
of payments that aren’t considered countable income are public
assistance, social security benefits, food stamps, low income home
energy assistance program benefits, foster care payments, certain
housing and utility subsidies, and weatherization payments. There
are income limits of course and they are strict, if you exceed them
by a penny you don’t qualify. The limits are different depending on
the amount of family members living in the home and requesting the
benefits.

You will have to have proof of your resources and family size to
determine if you have resource limits and are eligible. Different
groups of qualifiers will vary in what resources they can have.
Resource limits do not apply for those persons with children at
home and under the age of 21. Resources that are counted in
eligibility determination are cash, checking and/or saving
accounts, certificates, Christmas or vacation clubs, stocks and
bonds, some types of trust funds, life insurance, vehicles,
revocable burial funds, and non-resident property. Items that
cannot count against you when determining eligibility are your
home, burial space and marker, and one vehicle per household. If
you are a student and get federal grants and loans, those cannot be
counted either. Find out more about Medicaid Madness – The Latest in Eligibility Requirements

DISCLAIMER: This information is for educational and informational
purposes only. The content is not intended to be a substitute for
professional advice. Always seek the advice of a licensed Insurance
Agent or Broker with any questions you may have regarding any
Insurance Matter.

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